Australia

Why Study Australia


Australia is home to five of the best thirty student cities in the world. This means that there are plenty of amazing places for you to live and study. How should you choose which Australian location is right for you and your ambitions? The following information provides you with an overview of life in Australia and will help determine where you should go for the best studying experience.Australia is recognized as a great place to live – but did you know Australia also offers a world-class education? The Australian education system has produced scientists, designers, educators, entrepreneurs, artists and humanitarians who have changed the world, winning awards from Oscars to Nobel prizes. Their global achievements include the “black box” now on every airplane, the Earth hour initiative, and the invention of Wi-Fi. Australia is proud of the individuals who have studied and worked in Australia (whether they were born here or another country) and gone on to achieve great things and contribute to making the world a better place.

World class (dynamic and progressive) education
Global Recognition

We are means that we are truly overseas education oriented consultant in town with individual attention, available staff having strong industry experience for a personal approach.

From that day you become a Nmark student you can expect guidance and support likewise your parents.

To begin studying in Australia, there is a range of entry requirements you may have to meet.

English language requirements

In some cases, you may need to provide results of an English language test. Be aware that the English language skill level required by an institution can be different from the level of skill required for your student visa application. You should carefully check student visa information on both the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) website and the institution website for any English language requirements.

Academic requirements

The academic requirements (including evidence of English language skills) you need to study in Australia will vary depending on the level of education you want to study. Institutions can have different entry requirements, so read the course information on their website carefully and contact them to ask for advice.

Here is some general guidance on entry requirements for the different levels of study:

English language– Entry requirements vary between institutions, and according to the level of English language course you want to study.

Schools– Entry requirements vary between schools depending on the state or territory you will be studying in. Academic performance and ability are considered during the application process.

Vocational education and training– In most cases there are no entrance exams for VET institutions. However, some courses may have specific pre-requisite subjects or work experience requirements.

Higher Education Undergraduate– To gain entry into an Australian undergraduate course you will need to have an Australian Senior Secondary Certificate of Education (Year 12), or the overseas equivalent. Some undergraduate courses may also have specific pre-requisite subjects.

Higher Education Postgraduate– As well as the satisfactory completion of at least one degree at the undergraduate level, your institution may take research ability or relevant work experience into consideration.

Tip: To meet the academic requirements of an Australian high school qualification, consider taking a Foundation course. Also called bridging study, they are intensive courses that will help you meet the entry requirements. They are usually one year long and are offered by most higher education institutions.

The student visa you need depends on your chosen course of study. As a guide, the typical key requirements you will need to meet are:

  • Issued an electronic Confirmation of Enrolment (eCoE) certificate.
  • Meet the Genuine Temporary Entrant requirement.
  • Immigration and Border Protection
  • Sufficient funds for airfares, course fees, and living costs.
  • English language proficiency.
  • Meet health and character requirements.
  • Acceptable Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC).
  • Read more about the Student Visa Key Requirements.

The Home affairs  website provides detailed information on student visas. It also has a Visa Wizard to help you identify which visa you might be eligible for.

Student visa (Subclass 500)
All of the following types of study are included on this visa. For more information about student visa, visit the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP):

  • independent ELICOS (English Language Intensive Courses for Overseas Students)
  • schools (primary and secondary)
  • secondary school exchange program
  • vocational education and training (VET)
  • higher education
  • postgraduate research
  • non-award courses
  • international students sponsored by the Department of Foreign Affairs or Defence.

Other visa options
For shorter periods of study, you can apply for a Visitor or Working Holiday Visa. There is also a visa option specifically for student guardians.

Visitor Visa (Subclasses 600, 601, 651)

    • Maximum 3 months study.
    • Intention to visit Australia is genuine.
    • Meet health and character requirements.
    • Sufficient money to support yourself during the stay in Australia.

Working Holiday Visa (Subclass 417 and 462)

  • Maximum 4 months study.
  • Aged 18 to 30 years and hold an eligible passport.
  • The principal purpose of a holiday in Australia.
  • Enter or remain in Australia as a genuine visitor.
  • Meet health and character requirements.
  • Sufficient funds for airfares and personal support for stay in Australia

Student Guardian (Subclass 590)

  • Provides for certain persons to reside with a student in Australia, where the student requires a guardian, ie: the student is under 18 years of age.
  • Study up to 3 months or study ELICOS for 20 hours per week for a duration of the visa.
  • Meet Genuine Temporary Entrant requirement.
  • Sufficient funds for airfares and living costs.
  • Meet health and character requirements.
  • Acceptable health insurance.

Read more about Student Guardian visas(opens in a new window) on the DIBP website.
Temporary Graduate (Subclass 485)
This visa allows eligible international students who have completed an Australian education to stay in Australia to gain work experience.

  • You can work in Australia for a period of 18 months and up to 4 years, depending on your qualification.
  • This visa does not restrict the type of work you may do or the number of hours you may work.
  • Applications for this visa must be made in Australia and you must hold an eligible student visa in the last 6 months.
  • You must meet the Australian study, English proficiency, health insurance, health, and character requirements.
  • You must meet the specific requirements of the stream in which you are applying for this visa.

Visa options and requirements are sometimes subject to change. In order to stay up to date, the best place to get accurate information is on the Department of Immigration and Border Protection(opens in a new window) website. The website provides comprehensive information on the types of visas available for different levels of study in Australia, including people considering bring family members with them (whether guardians, partners/spouses or children). You will also have access to help and advice about your specific visa requirements.

Another option is to contact Nmark Education, We will help with your visa application, course application, and answer any other questions.

Work while you study

Working while you study in Australia can help complement your study and living experience. There are a number of reasons you might want to undertake part-time work while studying in Australia, including assisting with living expenses and gaining work experience in your study area.
Most student visas allow you to work for up to 40 hours every two weeks while your course is in session, and unrestricted hours during any scheduled course break, but before you undertake any paid work you need to make sure your visa allows you to work. Find out more at the Department of Immigration and Border Protection website.

Work while you study
Working while you study in Australia can help complement your study and living experience. There are a number of reasons you might want to undertake part-time work while studying in Australia, including assisting with living expenses and gaining work experience in your study area.
Most student visas allow you to work for up to 40 hours every two weeks while your course is in session, and unrestricted hours during any scheduled course break, but before you undertake any paid work you need to make sure your visa allows you to work. Find out more at the Department of Immigration and Border Protection website.

Work opportunities after studies
There some popular categories wherein students mostly apply for their further stay in Australia-

  • Students who are going for diploma courses will not be entitled to “After studies work permit”.
  • Students who are going for Bachelor’s and Master’s (Coursework) courses will be entitled to 2 years after studies work permit.
  • Students who are going for Master’s by Research courses will be entitled to 3 years after study work permit.

Paid work
Australia has a wide range of industries and many have part-time employment opportunities, including:

  • Retail– supermarkets, department and clothing stores.
  • Hospitality– cafes, bars, and restaurants.
  • Tourism– hotels, and motels.
  • Agricultural– farming, and fruit-picking.
  • Sales and telemarketing.
  • Administration or Clerical roles.
  • Tutoring.

If you have existing qualifications and/or professional work experience, you may be able to secure casual or part-time work in your field.

Internships
Paid or unpaid internships can be a great way to get exposure to the professional, financial and creative industries. Learn more about getting an internship on the Internships page in the Education System section of this website.

Volunteering
There are many charities and non-government organizations (NGOs) in Australia and they always need volunteers to help out. It can be a great way to meet friends, get some hands-on work experience and give back to the community. To find out more about volunteering, start your search at http://www.govolunteer.com.au/

Your rights
Everyone working in Australia, including international students or those on working holiday visas, have basic rights at work. These rights protect entitlement to:

  • A minimum wage.
  • Challenge of unfair dismissal from the job
  • Breaks and rest periods.
  • A healthy and safe work environment.

Most employers in Australia are covered by an ‘award’, which sets minimum wages and conditions for a given field of work or industry. To find out more about your work rights visit the Australian Government’s Fair Work website.

You will also need to get a tax file number to work in Australia. Visit the Australian Taxation Office website to find out more information on getting a tax file number, as well as information about paying taxes in Australia.

Finding Work
There are plenty of ways to find work that suits you, including:

  • Newspapers and online job sites.
  • Some institutions provide job notice-boards on campus and online. Contact your institution’s international student support staff to find out what options your institution offers.
  • Register your details at a recruitment firm; many of them help place people in casual or short-term work.

The minimum cost of living
The Department of Immigration and Border Protection has financial requirements you must meet in order to receive a student visa for Australia.

Annual living costs amounts for students, guardians and accompanying family members  – 23/10/2019

On 23 October 2019, the annual living costs amounts for students, guardians and accompanying family members was updated in line with Consumer Price Index (CPI) increases to mitigate the risk of visa holders falling into financial hardship during their stay in Australia.
The following annual living costs and expenses were updated:

    1. for a primary applicant:
      an increase from AUD20,292 to AUD21,041
    2. for a spouse or de facto partner of the primary applicant:
      an increase from AUD7,100 to AUD7,362
    3. for a dependent child:
      an increase from AUD3,040 to AUD3,152
    4. annual school costs:
      an increase from AUD8,000 to AUD8,296
    5. personal annual income if there is no secondary applicant:
      an increase from AUD60,000 to AUD62,222
    6. personal annual income where there is a secondary applicant:
      an increase from AUD 70,000 to AUD72,592

Key Changes
The SSVF has been designed to make the process of applying for a student visa simpler to navigate for genuine students, deliver a more targeted approach to immigration integrity and reduce red tape for business.

From 1 July 2016:

  • international students will apply for a single < a href=”https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-finder>Student visa (subclass 500) regardless of their chosen course of study
  • student guardians will apply for the newStudent Guardian visa (subclass 590)
  • a single immigration risk framework will apply to all international students
  • all students and student guardians will generally be required to lodge their visa application online by creating an account in
  • Financial capacity requirement
  • English language requirement
  • Evidence of enrolment
  • Changing course
  • School sector requirements
  • Welfare for under 18-year-old students
  • Course packaging
  • Family members of students
  • Reporting by the education sector
  • Processing times

Genuine Temporary Entry requirements

DIAC will be undertaking a more involved assessment of student visas to ensure that applicants have genuine intentions to study and are not using the student visa program to:
Leave their country of origin for any reason except for studying a course that will assist the student’s future career.
Enter Australia for any reason except for studying a course that will assist the student’s future career.
Remain in Australia for long periods (i.e. maintain ‘de facto residency’) by rolling from one course to the next.
Avoid obligations in the applicant’s home country.
When assessing the Genuine Temporary Entrant criteria, DIAC will consider the following factors. Applicants may need to provide further evidence and submissions to answer the types of questions listed below. For applicants under the age of 18, DIAC will assess the intentions of their parents, guardian or adult spouse.

The applicant’s circumstances in their home country
What is the reason the course cannot be studied in the applicant’s home country?
What personal/ family ties does the applicant have with their home country?
What economic incentive does the applicant have for returning to their home country?
Are there military/ national service commitments that the applicant may be trying to avoid?
Is there political/ civil unrest in the applicant’s home country?

The applicant’s circumstances in Australia
What personal/ family ties does the applicant have with Australia that might encourage them to try to remain in Australia long-term?
What courses have the applicant studied already? Does the student’s proposed study in Australia show the development of career skills?
What economic incentive does the applicant have for trying to remain in Australia?
Can the applicant show that they have researched their intended course of study, education provider, the requirements for entry to the course, and general living conditions in Australia?

The value and relevance of the course to the applicant’s future
Will the course assist the applicant to obtain employment or improve employment prospects in their home country?
Is the proposed course relevant to the applicant’s past/ future career or study pathways?
What salary could the applicant expect to receive in their home country, compared to Australia, with the proposed qualifications?

The applicant’s immigration history
Has the applicant previously had an Australian visa refused or canceled?
Has the applicant previously had a visa application to another country refused or canceled?
Did the applicant previously comply with the conditions on their previous Australian visas (if applicable)?
Did the applicant previously comply with the immigration laws of other countries they have visited?
How long has the student been in Australia on student visas?
How many courses have the student enrolled in overall?
Has the applicant successfully completed any qualifications during this time?
Is the new proposed study relevant to these qualifications?
How long has the student been in Australia on temporary visas overall?

Any other matter considered relevant
Information provided by the applicant in their application
Information available to DIAC from other sources about the applicant
Information available to DIAC from other sources about a relative of the applicant
Information available to DIAC about the country of origin

Examples of where a person might fail the Genuine Temporary Entry requirement may include:
Enrolling in a series of short, inexpensive courses, which DIAC believes are only being undertaken in order to prolong the person’s stay in Australia.
Extensive periods of time in Australia without having successfully completed a qualification.
Extensive periods of time in Australia moving from course to course or to different education providers.
A history of visa refusal, or non-compliance with immigration requirements in Australia or another country.

One of the most interesting hoops that you will have to jump through in order to study in Australia is to provide proof of financial resources. In order to even obtain your student visa, you have to be able to prove that you can take care of yourself financially for the first year or two that you are in the country (depending on your assessment level, which we cover in our section on Student Visas)

There are a few reasons that this proof is required. Mainly because the Australian government wants to insure that you will be able to get the most out of your education. Money can create a lot of stress, and if you’re barely making it, it can have an effect on every part of your life. By making sure that you have the financial resources you need available, you’ll be in a better place.